Black history month coloring pages for kindergarten


Me and my wee lad are big fans of Disney's movies. So you can be sure I always have Disney pictures on standby. Give him anything with Pluto or Donald Duck on and he will be very happy! Even the newer Disney stars like Handy Manny are very popular with him and I am happy that like all of their products, these characters are positive role models. You don't have to worry about anything your child may see when they are watching a Disney show! My secret wish and hope is that when he grows a little he will enjoy superheroes as much as I did at his age. I ate, slept and drank Superheroes practically when I was a young teen and really hope we can have this in common too. Batman and Superman were my favourites and I have already seen plenty of cool pictures that we could have a lot of fun together working on! I think all boys grow into a thirst for safe adventure and drama so hopefully my wishes will come true and soon I can be telling him about the adventures of his heroes while we select colors for Batman's cape! You can find lots of coloring books that fall into this category with Winnie the Pooh featured in various scenes. He may be alone or with one of his many friends that are popular too including Tigger and Christopher Robbins. There are mini coloring books that will easily fit into your purse. They are ideal for long car rides, waiting at the doctor's office, or even as an activity at a restaurant while your family is waiting for a meal.

The precursor to Black History Month was created in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week”. This week was chosen because it coincided with the birthday of Abraham Lincoln on February 12 and of Frederick Douglass on February 14, both of which dates black communities had celebrated together since the late 19th century. Negro History Week was the center of the equation. The thought-process behind the week was never recorded, but scholars acknowledge two reasons for its birth: recognition and importance. Woodson felt deeply that at least one week would allow for the general movement to become something annually celebrated. Also, after the ten year long haul to successfully complete his “Journal of Negro History”, he realized the subject deserved to resonate with a greater audience.

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